Growing demand for streetlights in Cavendish, but who will pay for them?

By Jim Brown

It seems everyone in Cavendish wants to get a streetlight, but should the resort municipality pay for them?

CAO Brenda MacDonald, at the Dec 9 monthly meeting, said she recently fielded a call for one in Friendly Lane and from some other people in Forest Lane.

But that’s far from the only requests.

Most of the demand for new streetlights is coming from Seawood Estates, represented by a vocal residents’ association. There could be as many 15 installed if all the demands are met from residents. The development features several sharp turns and three-way intersections, all without lights.

Councillor and Seawood Estates resident Bill Drost originally brought the issue of streetlights to council’s attention. He said many Seawood residents continue to “live in the dark.”

In areas heavily trafficked by tourists new streetlights are paid for by the municipality. Tourists descend in the summer, at a time of the year “when we have 16 hours of daylight,” said Mr Drost.

Residents, meanwhile, are faced with “16 hours of darkness” in the wintertime, long after tourists have left.

In the case of Seawood Estates, which has 23 full-time residents, any property owner wishing to have a streetlight installed must pay for it themselves. But Seawood Estates has paid for some installations, including a more recent one at the bottom of Bayview and Seawood, right inside the entrance.

Resort Municipality Mayor Matthew Jelley estimates there are three lights paid for Seawood Estates.

Some Cavendish residents, like Planning Board Chair George Clark Dunning, would prefer not to have streetlights in their neighbourhoods, opting for “serenity” over greater illumination.

Councillor Drost said lights are often pointing in the wrong direction and casting illumination too far from their source and even into homeowners’ windows. They may also be improperly shaded.

Mayor Jelley and others were worried about setting a precedent if the resort municipality began paying for streetlights on certain private roads and subdivisions.

The streetlights issue was eventually tabled for future discussion, with Mr Jelley seeking more information about how many lights would be needed and what the financial impact would be on the resort municipality.

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Getting into the festive spirit at the Stanley Bridge Hall

Photos by Jim Brown

It was bitterly cold outside the doors of the Stanley Bridge WI on Dec 7 for the WI’s annual Christmas craft fair but it was warm indoors with several vendors attending to hundreds of visitors over the four hours the craft fair ran. There were lots of wonderful gifts to purchase and the building was filled with the sights and scents of Christmas, including plenty of evergreen boughs, apple cider, wooden ornaments, candies and baked delicacies, landscape photos and paintings and woolen goods of all kinds. Some vendors also set up displays outdoors. Click on an image to view images in a lightbox

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Launching a new strategy, logo to draw tourists

By Jim Brown

A new brand and a new strategy for drawing more tourists to the central part of the Island were unveiled on Nov 25 at a public workshop in Kensington.

Presenter Brianna Flood.

The collaborative ‘Heart of the Island Initiative’ drew dozens of tourism operators to Kensington’s Murray Christian Centre.

Partners for the event were the Town of Kensington, the Kensington and Area Chamber of Commerce and the Central Coastal Tourism Partnership. One of the speakers was Kensington Mayor Rowan Casely.

Organizers want tourist operators to use the hashtag “Heart of PEI” to showcase the area’s many beautiful, striking attractions and the operators’ businesses. Tourist operators were encouraged to work together and pool their resources to draw more visitors – including working with Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms. They were asked to apply the hashtags to scenic photos posted on websites and across social media platforms.
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Participants described a wide variety of opportunities ready for seizing, including capturing more of the booming cycling market by making businesses ‘cycling friendly’ and even offering stations where cyclists can fix deflated tires and complete minor repairs. Others talked about the great opportunities offered by the legalization of cannabis and by drawing more tourists from the LGBTQ community.

Still others talked about the need to promote the area’s many culinary destinations, as well as local artists, farming, beaches and outdoor adventures.
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Dorian strains resources of Maritime Electric, Resort Municipality

Story and photos by Jim Brown

Angus Orford, Maritime Electric’s CEO, on left and Enrique Riveroll, the utility’s VP of customer service.

Post Tropical Storm Dorian slashed through PEI in early September, devastating much of the Island and leaving many questions in its wake.

Maritime Electric CEO Angus Orford was joined by Enrique Riveroll, the utility’s VP of customer service, for a two hour presentation at the Resort Municipality’s regular monthly meeting in early November.

A big part of their presentation dealt with criticism levelled at the Province for not declaring a state of emergency and accessing additional federal resources.

Sometimes you can just have too many people in one place, causing complications, said Orford, especially if they aren’t specially trained to deal with massive electrical disruptions, such power line technicians and utility arborists.

Mayor Matthew Jelley observed Parks Canada brought in trained personnel from places like Jasper, Alberta, Quebec and Newfoundland to cut trees, since they had the level of chainsaw use training required by Parks Canada.

Being out of power for a prolonged period of time doesn’t exactly create warm and fuzzy feelings for utility companies trying to restore everything to normal.

“Customers out for a week are probably not going to fire any accolades at Maritime Electric. But from our perspective it was an extraordinary response,” said Orford.

Workers were busy across the Island, including Kensington, for weeks after Dorian.


Re-energizing lines safely takes time, he said.

Trees fall across lines forcing workers to “isolate, clear the tree, re-energize that section and go on to the next section,” said Orford

He added there could be “beautiful weather” to work on power restoration, “but 1,500 fuses go.”
The Island’s Emergency Measures Organization believes people should be able to take care of themselves for three days, said Orford.

Of course that calculus could change in really cold weather that includes ice-storms and heavy snow.

Fortunately, Dorian struck PEI in early September and in the immediate aftermath the weather was sunny and warm.

“The reality of this type of storm is that it creates a lot of labour intensive damage” and people would run up to a lineman and ask to have power restored to their homes when that isn’t possible, said Orford.

A tree on top of a power line in New London, shortly after Dorian.


It’s a lot different than a car striking and knocking over a pole and a reasonable time frame for repairs can be given, such as four hours.

In the case of Dorian, “Some roads you couldn’t even get down till the trees were out of the way for assessment,” he explained.

Mayor Jelley said hotels booked during Dorian saw significant losses, with guests leaving after just a couple of days – believing the power would be out for much longer. In fact, the power was often restored a short time later, though many were without power for six days.

Maritime Electric has 120,000 poles in the power system, with 100,000 replaced since the 1980s. A total of 80 crews were available to handle the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian.

The Resort Municipality, despite its status as a small community, swells to a population of 20,000 or so in the summer due to a heavy influx of visitors and seasonal residents and as many as 25,000 when the Cavendish Beach Music Festival (CBMF) is on, in early July.

Discussions eventually moved to the problems faced in Cavendish peak periods of the spring and summer.

Deputy Mayor and local businessperson Linda Lowther said her frozen yogurt took a hit last summer.

“We have a frozen yogurt business and we have five ice cream machines and every time Maritime Electric has done any kind of a switch or played with the wires our machines would go down and we’d lose product.”

Lines of communication should be improved, she and other councillors said.

Mayor Jelley said brownouts also happened on the Cavendish Beach Music Festival Weekend.

And he went on to explain that when maintenance to the Rattenbury substation was done earlier this summer in mid-June: “We had fuses blowing, capacitors blowing on motors (and) refrigeration equipment in restaurants failing.”

Maritime Electric is hoping to get a St Mary’s Road project launched before the summer to bring a new transmission line to Cavendish. Mayor Jelley said he hoped it wouldn’t cause too much disruption during the CBMF and other busy times in the high season.

That project is part of a budget application in front of the Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission.
Mayor Jelley want to to say: “If you need room for a substation in Cavendish I’ll probably donate the land…Certainly if there’s a transmission line up Route 6 I would do what I could to advocate…and if you need land slightly off Rte 6 and it means more reliable power then I’d be happy to donate the half an acre to make it happen.”

Cavendish is growing and so is the demand for electricity.

“Every cottage operator is putting in those heat pumps on all of their units,” said Linda Lowther.

Mayor Jelley, who is the president of Maritime Fun Group which operates Shining Waters Family Fun Park, said his business is “looking at four new waterslides…120 horsepower total, run 10 to 12 hours a day.”

When the St Mary’s Road project is finished Cavendish will have three feeds running into it.

The Resort Municipality has 14 lift stations, five telephone exchanges and three electrical substations.

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North Rustico remembers its fallen soldiers

Photos by Jim Brown

Hundreds of people attended Remembrance Day ceremonies at the North Rustico cenotaph on Monday, Nov 11, joining thousands of others in services across the Island marking the sacrifices of Canadian soldiers in wars and peacekeeping operations. Attendees were greeted with snow, rain and fierce gusts of wind that forced many to seek shelter under umbrellas. The bleak weather matched the solemn, somber mood during the ceremonies.

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Big crowd for New London Community Complex Christmas craft fair

Jim Brown photos
The parking lot was jammed with cars, forcing many motorists to park on the highway’s shoulders at the New London Community Complex’s annual Christmas craft fair on Oct 20.

More than 50 booths were set up and hundreds of people at a time made their way through the building seeking the perfect gift for the holidays. Halloween-themed merchandise was also on sale. Unlike last year’s event, there was no power outage to disrupt shopping.

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Cleanup work at Cavendish Campground hindered by trespassers

By Jim Brown

Parks Canada’s Hurricane Dorian cleanup work on the Cavendish Campground and the main beach is being impeded by unwanted sightseers.

“When they spot people on the site everyone has to drop their chainsaws and shut down for 15 minutes,” Mayor Matthew Jelley told councillors at the Resort Municipality’s monthly council meeting on Sept 16.

“Under their labor laws and codes it’s (hurting) cleanup right now.”

These people are being treated as “trespassers” when they show up, said Mr Jelley in his update.

Mayor Jelley went on to say Parks Canada is bringing in commissionaires to the main beach site to steer people away from areas where restoration work is underway.

A great deal of the cleanup work will be done by the end of the week he said. But Hurricane Dorian has caused tremendous damage to certain areas that will take a long time to bring back to some semblance of normalcy and may even prompt changes that could impact the Resort Municipality’s strategic plan.

For instance 80 per cent of trees have been uprooted and knocked down, falling atop power lines, water lines and sewer lines, he said.

On Sept 16 access was still not possible for workers to 20 per cent of the campground, which will be closed for a prolonged period.

Parks Canada will have to tap cleanup funds through various government agencies.

Mr Jelley met with Parks Canada officials four times since Hurricane Dorian struck the Island, including just before the Sept 16 Council meeting

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Bridge jumpers show their stuff at River Days Festival, Aug 25

Story and photos by Jim Brown

The word “car” was replaced with “boat” as youngsters assembled at the bridge at the Stanley Bridge wharf on Sunday, Aug. 25, when prizes were handed out to fearless jumpers as part of the 17th annual River Days Festival. Jumpers had to be wary of pleasure craft travelling near and underneath the bridge.
Some older adults also took the plunge during the River Days weekend.

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Heavy turnout at River Days farmers market

Story and photos by Jim Brown

The Stanley Bridge Centre’s parking lot was jammed for much of the morning and afternoon, during the SBC’s first, and only, farmer’s market of the season.
More than 15 vendors were on hand for the farmer’s market, which offered crafts, baked goods, artworks and fresh produce from the fields surrounding Stanley Bridge. The Stanley Bridge Centre was unable to offer farmers markets during much of the summer because of extensive renovations to the building, which included new washrooms, a new accessible entrance and a new, fully equipped kitchen.
The SBC farmer’s market was a featured event in the 17th annual River Days Festival.

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Seventeenth Annual River Days opens at Stanley Bridge Centre

Photos by Jim Brown

On Friday, Aug 23 dozens of people visited the newly renovated Stanley Bridge Centre to participate in opening ceremonies for the 17th Annual River Days Festival (Aug 23-25).

There were plenty of delicious finger foods on hand, ice cream and a large cake featuring this year’s pirate theme. Among the attending dignitaries were Malpeque Liberal MP Wayne Easter, Rustico-Emerald PC MLA and Education Minister Brad Trivers, Alfred Fyfe and Trout River Road author, educator and former MLA Marion Murphy.
Talented musical performer Stewart MacFarlane provided the evening’s entertainment.

Stanley Bridge Centre volunteers were busy early the next morning preparing the building for the season’s first, and only, farmer’s market, featuring more than a dozen vendors.

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Music festival goes off without a hitch, though tourist operator reports lineup turned off several potential guests

Story and photos by Jim Brown

A public meeting soliciting feedback on the July 5-7 Cavendish Beach Music Festival drew a sparse crowd, with just 12 people dropping by the North Rustico Lions Club, including Island Senator and Cavendish resident Mike Duffy.

Six officials faced a sparse audience at a public meeting seeking feedback from the 2019 Cavendish Beach Music Festival.

Perhaps that was because there was little to talk about. Complaints about the three day country music extravaganza were even scarcer than the number of attendees.

The July 29 meeting, chaired by Linda Lowther, Deputy Mayor of the Resort Municipality of Cavendish, ran just shy of 26 minutes.

Facing the 12 attendees were six officials, including an RCMP officer, Resort Municipality CAO Brenda MacDonald, a representative of the PEI Liquor Control Board and a Cavendish Beach Music Festival spokesperson.

Though there were was little damage caused to the community by rampaging country music fans feeling their oats, that doesn’t mean some in the resort municipality didn’t face the prospect of economic loss.

As many as 50 performers were showcased at the July 5-7 Cavendish Beach Music Festival.

For instance, the owner of a cottage business who reported several guests who booked accommodations for last year’s festival decided not to go this year after learning the lineup, featuring top acts Carrie Underwood and Eric Church, was less than stellar.

“My guests said the shows were okay but the lineup wasn’t as good as they expected,” wrote the owner in a letter to the resort municipality, one of three submitted.

“They said they’d rather pay more money – up to $50 more for a three day ticket – and really enjoy the lineup.”

They didn’t want to spend all that money “to come to Cavendish and pay for accommodations and travel to get a mediocre lineup.”

The cottage business owner went on to say the paying guests of seven of the 11 cottages in 2018 had signed up for 2019, but once they learned this year’s lineup in November, they cancelled, asking instead to be put on the list for 2020.

“They said the lineup wasn’t worth coming for. They also said Canadian artists are not that good in most cases and that the festival people need to bring in better Canadian artists.”

But the business operator was impressed with this year’s crop of CBMF guests, saying they were very well behaved, “I had the best bunch ever.”

Jeff Squires, CEO of Whitecap Entertainment, the company that produces the CBMF, had a different take.

“I would suggest music is subjective. The festival will continue to showcase Canadian talent and all that it brings to the table,” he said.

Mr Squires said Atlantic Canadian and PEI musicians “will continue to be provided with more opportunities to learn and grow and develop their craft at the highest level…that is our mandate and something we are very proud of.”

Other attendees raised concerns about power outages around the time of the festival that led to inconveniences for guests, such as toilets not flushing at a campground.

One four hour outage ran for the festival’s first day, though it was not directly tied to the festival.

Senator Mike Duffy who has followed the 11 year history of the festival, told officials: “I’d say it’s the best year yet…the residents certainly appreciate it down our way.”

Others said instances of intoxication and other bad behavior associated with earlier years was way down.

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